“Once intended to reduce crime, the traffic barricades that block hundreds of city streets may be having the opposite effect.” Ya think? 🤔<br><br>”Using census and crime data coupled with sophisticated mapping programs, researchers at St. Louis University have found the barriers — including those pervasive concrete planters known as “Schoemehl pots” — are associated with, at worst, “elevated violent crime rates at the neighborhood level,” and, at best, not doing anything to make an area safer.”<br><br>No shit. 🤨. These pots block people in and make it more difficult for residents to maneuver through their own neighborhoods, anyone who make a wrong turn and for victims looking for an easy out. <br><br>Make streets safer? Ummmm, no.

“Once intended to reduce crime, the traffic barricades that block hundreds of city streets may be having the opposite effect.” Ya think? 🤔

“Using census and crime data coupled with sophisticated mapping programs, researchers at St. Louis University have found the barriers — including those pervasive concrete planters known as “Schoemehl pots” — are associated with, at worst, “elevated violent crime rates at the neighborhood level,” and, at best, not doing anything to make an area safer.”

No shit. 🤨. These pots block people in and make it more difficult for residents to maneuver through their own neighborhoods, anyone who make a wrong turn and for victims looking for an easy out.

Make streets safer? Ummmm, no.

To make St. Louis safer, hundreds of streets were closed. What if that was a mistake?

New research finds street closures are ‘at best ineffective and at worst associated with higher rates of violent crime in neighborhoods.’

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