Not radical. Predictable. Co-opted. Scripted. Commodified. This is exactly what BLM/Deray and the many, many, many nonprofits that touched down in Ferguson were on when they hijacked our movement and selected local negros to ‘sell it’… They threw in ‘celebrity’ to make it an easy sell. The March for Our Lives is using young white millennials of Parkland in the same manner… with all the trimmings… <br><br>”Regardless of its long-term effects, the March for Our Lives is the first major statement by Americans born after 1999, who have presented a new template for protest. The March for Our Lives was a massive outcry against extreme violence delivered with a mix of pop sentiment, corporate coöperation, and an awareness of the socioeconomic privilege that allows certain voices to be heard louder than others. Youth protest today does not look like it did fifty years ago, although that’s boring to say. Many of the students came to Washington, D.C., with their parents. Stoneman Douglas students were met by politicians on Capitol Hill. The Washington Wizards invited them to basketball practice. Student journalists held a panel at the Newseum. A concert the night before was thrown in their honor, and Shake Shack sponsored a sign-making party.<br><br>The student leaders were grateful, thanking their celebrity donors and corporate sponsors on social media, posing in front of the little blue bird at Twitter’s Washington offices. One student even photographed and tweeted the boxes of granola bars and snacks donated by Kind. The media could not love them enough: there were interviews on “60 Minutes,” NPR’s “Morning Edition,” and the late-night news shows. There were major interactive packages in Teen Vogue, and a Time magazine cover. There was, in short, so much consensus about the message of the student movement that it has to be one of the least anti-establishment social movements in American history. What the student leaders seem to be saying is that they don’t want trouble, and, had a person not arrived at their school with a gun, they would have kept their heads down and scored high on their S.A.T.s.”

Not radical. Predictable. Co-opted. Scripted. Commodified. This is exactly what BLM/Deray and the many, many, many nonprofits that touched down in Ferguson were on when they hijacked our movement and selected local negros to 'sell it'... They threw in 'celebrity' to make it an easy sell. The March for Our Lives is using young white millennials of Parkland in the same manner... with all the trimmings...

"Regardless of its long-term effects, the March for Our Lives is the first major statement by Americans born after 1999, who have presented a new template for protest. The March for Our Lives was a massive outcry against extreme violence delivered with a mix of pop sentiment, corporate coöperation, and an awareness of the socioeconomic privilege that allows certain voices to be heard louder than others. Youth protest today does not look like it did fifty years ago, although that’s boring to say. Many of the students came to Washington, D.C., with their parents. Stoneman Douglas students were met by politicians on Capitol Hill. The Washington Wizards invited them to basketball practice. Student journalists held a panel at the Newseum. A concert the night before was thrown in their honor, and Shake Shack sponsored a sign-making party.

The student leaders were grateful, thanking their celebrity donors and corporate sponsors on social media, posing in front of the little blue bird at Twitter’s Washington offices. One student even photographed and tweeted the boxes of granola bars and snacks donated by Kind. The media could not love them enough: there were interviews on “60 Minutes,” NPR’s “Morning Edition,” and the late-night news shows. There were major interactive packages in Teen Vogue, and a Time magazine cover. There was, in short, so much consensus about the message of the student movement that it has to be one of the least anti-establishment social movements in American history. What the student leaders seem to be saying is that they don’t want trouble, and, had a person not arrived at their school with a gun, they would have kept their heads down and scored high on their S.A.T.s."

The March for Our Lives Presents a Radical New Model for Youth Protest

The outcry against violence was delivered with a mix of pop sentiment, corporate coöperation, and an awareness of the socioeconomic privilege that allows certain voices to be heard louder than others.
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