Not just Jeffrey Boyd, this is how it plays out in the Board of Aldermen where black leaders actually fund white developers who are responsible for blighted condition, derelict buildings and empty lots in our neighborhoods in exchange for a piece of the pie and campaign donations,<br><br>”the motivating factor might have been heavy campaign donations to key players on the board who muscled the subsidies toward approval — despite the horrendous track record of the developer involved, Paul McKee.<br><br>Any time a politician accepts money from someone who has pending business before the city board must accept that, in the public’s eye, the appearance of a conflict of interest justifies distrust and skepticism.<br><br>The previous week, aldermen had been poised to seek a delay in considering McKee’s project pending further discussion at the committee level. But Aldermanic President Lewis Reed intervened personally to move it forward — a rare move by him.<br><br>As the Post-Dispatch’s Jacob Barker and Mark Schlinkmann reported, an official with the city’s economic development office had openly questioned the feasibility of McKee’s plan for a three-bed urgent-care facility, followed by construction of a $73 million, 103,000-square-foot hospital with a medical school. McKee is known for grandiose plans that fail to pan out, landing him into debt and court entanglements. McKee’s vast collection of vacant land and crumbling north St.Louis houses is testament to his inability to deliver.<br><br>Reed nevertheless seemed determined to do McKee’s bidding. He called in Alderman Jeffrey Boyd for help, even though Boyd doesn’t represent the ward where McKee’s project would go. Since 2014, Reed’s campaign has received a combined $22,000 in donations from McKee’s attorney, Steve Stone, or companies connected to him. Boyd’s campaign has received $10,000 from them, including $4,000 this year. Alderman Tammika Hubbard, who represents the ward where the project would go, has substantial direct family business ties to McKee.”

Not just Jeffrey Boyd, this is how it plays out in the Board of Aldermen where black leaders actually fund white developers who are responsible for blighted condition, derelict buildings and empty lots in our neighborhoods in exchange for a piece of the pie and campaign donations,

“the motivating factor might have been heavy campaign donations to key players on the board who muscled the subsidies toward approval — despite the horrendous track record of the developer involved, Paul McKee.

Any time a politician accepts money from someone who has pending business before the city board must accept that, in the public’s eye, the appearance of a conflict of interest justifies distrust and skepticism.

The previous week, aldermen had been poised to seek a delay in considering McKee’s project pending further discussion at the committee level. But Aldermanic President Lewis Reed intervened personally to move it forward — a rare move by him.

As the Post-Dispatch’s Jacob Barker and Mark Schlinkmann reported, an official with the city’s economic development office had openly questioned the feasibility of McKee’s plan for a three-bed urgent-care facility, followed by construction of a $73 million, 103,000-square-foot hospital with a medical school. McKee is known for grandiose plans that fail to pan out, landing him into debt and court entanglements. McKee’s vast collection of vacant land and crumbling north St.Louis houses is testament to his inability to deliver.

Reed nevertheless seemed determined to do McKee’s bidding. He called in Alderman Jeffrey Boyd for help, even though Boyd doesn’t represent the ward where McKee’s project would go. Since 2014, Reed’s campaign has received a combined $22,000 in donations from McKee’s attorney, Steve Stone, or companies connected to him. Boyd’s campaign has received $10,000 from them, including $4,000 this year. Alderman Tammika Hubbard, who represents the ward where the project would go, has substantial direct family business ties to McKee.”

Editorial: Jeffrey Boyd, we’re offended that you’re offended

Politicians who accept campaign donations then advance the interests of the donor through public legislation deserve every bit of the scrutiny they receive. Alderman Jeffrey Boyd is a prime example

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