Meanwhile, the pressure is mounting on Wesley Bell,<br><br>”Even in defeat, McCulloch continued to defend his handling of the case, arguing that the federal investigation into the Brown incident, which found no violation of federal statutes, vindicates him. The problem with this reasoning is that the federal investigation only determined that there were no grounds for federal charges. Even former attorney general Eric H. Holder Jr. has argued that the federal civil rights standard of proof is “too high,” making it ineffective as a backstop for local prosecutors’ failures. The fact that the evidence gathered did not satisfy a heightened federal standard for a federal civil rights case doesn’t clear Wilson of all wrongdoing, especially after new troubling facts emerged with the release of the film “Stranger Fruit.” And Wilson was never charged with a crime, so reopening the investigation would not raise any issue of double jeopardy. It’s the right thing to do.<br><br>While it is true that charging and possibly even convicting Wilson would not end mass incarceration or create the broad structural change we need, it would have significance. The same desire that motivates the proposed Emmett Till Act, which encourages the Justice Department to investigate unsolved cases of racial violence during the civil rights movement, also motivates this call to finally have an honest consideration of Brown’s killing in a courtroom.<br><br>We need community healing, and we need to believe that this nation is still capable of pursuing justice.”

Meanwhile, the pressure is mounting on Wesley Bell,

"Even in defeat, McCulloch continued to defend his handling of the case, arguing that the federal investigation into the Brown incident, which found no violation of federal statutes, vindicates him. The problem with this reasoning is that the federal investigation only determined that there were no grounds for federal charges. Even former attorney general Eric H. Holder Jr. has argued that the federal civil rights standard of proof is “too high,” making it ineffective as a backstop for local prosecutors’ failures. The fact that the evidence gathered did not satisfy a heightened federal standard for a federal civil rights case doesn’t clear Wilson of all wrongdoing, especially after new troubling facts emerged with the release of the film “Stranger Fruit.” And Wilson was never charged with a crime, so reopening the investigation would not raise any issue of double jeopardy. It’s the right thing to do.

While it is true that charging and possibly even convicting Wilson would not end mass incarceration or create the broad structural change we need, it would have significance. The same desire that motivates the proposed Emmett Till Act, which encourages the Justice Department to investigate unsolved cases of racial violence during the civil rights movement, also motivates this call to finally have an honest consideration of Brown’s killing in a courtroom.

We need community healing, and we need to believe that this nation is still capable of pursuing justice."

Opinion | Reopen the Michael Brown investigation

For the sake of community healing, Ferguson’s next prosecutor should show that America still can deliver justice.
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