“In December, after months of inactivity at the site, the project’s partial walls collapsed. Last month, the city marked the site as “abandoned” after little communication from the contractor, St. Louis Building Commissioner Frank Oswald said.<br><br>The project would have brought three hospital beds and 24/7 emergency service to a part of north St. Louis that has few urgent care facilities and lower life expectancy. The area has the “highest health concerns” in the city, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Human Services.<br><br>“There’s basically been no activity,” said Oswald. “When we tried to get a hold of the contractor, they just basically told us they weren’t sure what would be the next step.”<br><br>The urgent care was originally supposed to be part of a $72 million complex of medical buildings, office space and hotels in the Northside Regeneration footprint. It had a Certificate of Need granted through a regulatory program run by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services for health care services and facilities.<br><br>The urgent care was just one project in McKee’s $8 billion Northside Regeneration project. That effort has stalled since last June, when the City of St. Louis accused the developer of failing to complete developments in a timely manner and neglecting multiple legal obligations.” <br><br>One project. <br><br>$8 billion.

“In December, after months of inactivity at the site, the project’s partial walls collapsed. Last month, the city marked the site as “abandoned” after little communication from the contractor, St. Louis Building Commissioner Frank Oswald said.

The project would have brought three hospital beds and 24/7 emergency service to a part of north St. Louis that has few urgent care facilities and lower life expectancy. The area has the “highest health concerns” in the city, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Human Services.

“There’s basically been no activity,” said Oswald. “When we tried to get a hold of the contractor, they just basically told us they weren’t sure what would be the next step.”

The urgent care was originally supposed to be part of a $72 million complex of medical buildings, office space and hotels in the Northside Regeneration footprint. It had a Certificate of Need granted through a regulatory program run by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services for health care services and facilities.

The urgent care was just one project in McKee’s $8 billion Northside Regeneration project. That effort has stalled since last June, when the City of St. Louis accused the developer of failing to complete developments in a timely manner and neglecting multiple legal obligations.”

One project.

$8 billion.

McKee Urgent Care Lost City Permits After Wall Collapse

A three-bed urgent-care hospital planned by developer Paul McKee has lost its city building permits. In December, after months of inactivity at the site,

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