How this is playing out locally…<br><br>”By invoking the Ku Klux Klan in the introductory sentence of her lawsuit, Gardner signaled how far she’s willing to go in exploiting racial divisions to explain her current legal and political predicament. Gardner asserts that a vast conspiracy of actors — including the city government, the police union, and Gerard Carmody, a court-appointed special prosecutor investigating her office — “have mobilized to thwart” her voter-mandated quest to “redress the scourge of historical inequality and rebuild trust in the criminal justice system among communities of color.”<br><br>Are racist elements present within some of the entities cited as defendants in her lawsuit? Absolutely. As Gardner correctly noted, several St. Louis police officers were cited in a 2019 expose by the Plain View Project as having posted racist and xenophobic items on Facebook, several dating back to 2014. None of the postings cited in Gardner’s lawsuit mentions her or her office.<br><br>Defendant Jeff Roorda, the police union’s controversial business manager, is friends on Facebook with several of the officers and former officers cited by the Plain View Project. Naming him as defendant on that basis is quite a stretch. Roorda often publicly criticizes Gardner, but even when he exercises his First Amendment rights in his own especially obnoxious way, that doesn’t mean he’s violating her civil rights.<br><br>Elective office in St. Louis is a hardball sport, often involving harsh and unfair criticism. Did Gardner somehow think she deserved a pass?”

How this is playing out locally…

“By invoking the Ku Klux Klan in the introductory sentence of her lawsuit, Gardner signaled how far she’s willing to go in exploiting racial divisions to explain her current legal and political predicament. Gardner asserts that a vast conspiracy of actors — including the city government, the police union, and Gerard Carmody, a court-appointed special prosecutor investigating her office — “have mobilized to thwart” her voter-mandated quest to “redress the scourge of historical inequality and rebuild trust in the criminal justice system among communities of color.”

Are racist elements present within some of the entities cited as defendants in her lawsuit? Absolutely. As Gardner correctly noted, several St. Louis police officers were cited in a 2019 expose by the Plain View Project as having posted racist and xenophobic items on Facebook, several dating back to 2014. None of the postings cited in Gardner’s lawsuit mentions her or her office.

Defendant Jeff Roorda, the police union’s controversial business manager, is friends on Facebook with several of the officers and former officers cited by the Plain View Project. Naming him as defendant on that basis is quite a stretch. Roorda often publicly criticizes Gardner, but even when he exercises his First Amendment rights in his own especially obnoxious way, that doesn’t mean he’s violating her civil rights.

Elective office in St. Louis is a hardball sport, often involving harsh and unfair criticism. Did Gardner somehow think she deserved a pass?”

Editorial: Circuit attorney’s frivolous lawsuit accuses detractors of vast, racist plot.

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s federal civil suit against a host of allegedly racist co-conspirators is, to say it politely, a longshot.

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